Acknowledge Someone’s Accomplishments Rather Than Complimenting Them

By: Emily Price

We all pass out compliments at some point or another, most often with the intention of expressing a positive sentiment toward another person.

Everything from “I really like your shirt!” to “I think you did a really good job here,” are commonplace in conversation, but they also have one thing in common: the word I. Fast Company story this week points out, that when you use I in that compliment you’re actually making your statement about yourself, not the other person. Read more »

Does grammar matter?

It can be hard sometimes, when speaking, to remember all of the grammatical rules that guide us when we’re writing. When is it right to say “the dog and me” and when should it be “the dog and I”? Does it even matter? Andreea S. Calude dives into the age-old argument between linguistic prescriptivists and descriptivists — who have two very different opinions on the matter.

Why incompetent people think they’re amazing?

How good are you with money? What about reading people’s emotions? How healthy are you, compared to other people you know? Knowing how our skills stack up against others is useful in many ways. But psychological research suggests that we’re not very good at evaluating ourselves accurately. In fact, we frequently overestimate our own abilities.

David Dunning describes the Dunning-Kruger effect.

Is this the best time to be productive?

Can’t be bothered on Fridays? Feeling lazy in the summer months? You’re not alone. Here’s why.


By Valentina D’Efilippo (charts) / Bryan Lufkin (text)

The festive season is over. Holiday parties and hangovers are done with for another year. Now, we’re back at work and ready to grab 2018 by the horns. So, as we plan for the year ahead, is there a time in our calendars when can we maximise our output in the office?

Turns out, there might be.
Read more »